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We are excited to introduce Frog Hollow Farm Kitchen Ketchup.  Many hands, minds, and hearts have put energy into bringing this product to the shelves. It all started in 2015 when the decision was made to grow tomatoes on a larger scale. Since this was the first year, we decided to wait before bringing them to the Farmer’s Markets to be sure of an adequate supply.


From mid-July through the end of October the veggie farmers worked tirelessly, harvesting vine-ripened, organic tomatoes for the kitchen. By August the yield was over 2,000lbs a week, which meant the Kitchen Staff would spend many hours laboring over this fruitful crop. The tomatoes were washed, prepped then carefully simmered and puréed, creating a flavorful base which was quickly frozen.



A sense of relief and accomplishment came over us as we wrapped up the season, having successfully captured the first large tomato harvest. As we thought about all the different ways to use it, we wanted to come up with a tomato product that was versatile enough to use every day and with a taste that would keep people coming back for more. We landed on making our Farm Kitchen Ketchup.

The Ketchup has a robust tomato flavor from four varieties of tomatoes: Valley Girl, San Marzano, Amish Paste, and Tiren. A bit of heat sneaks through at the end to bring a little complexity to each bite. The spreadable texture and a real tomato flavor pairs perfectly with burgers, veggie sandwiches, fries, Mac N Cheese, eggs, and much more.

Food in this country is often processed as quickly and cheaply as possible with additives such as high fructose corn syrup, but making this ketchup has truly been a labor of love. From selecting the tastiest varieties of tomatoes to hand stirring the simmering pot, we have been striving to create an honest product that is rustic yet refined. We hope that Frog Hollow Farm Kitchen Ketchup finds a special place in your home and in your heart.

Olive oil and chocolate go together like wine and cheese. The marriage of good quality chocolate and a good quality extra virgin olive oil has complex flavor notes that will arouse the taste buds. Our new Frog Hollow Farm Olive Oil product line showcases how the unique, buttery quality of olive oil quality can enhance the flavor of chocolate.

While creating the truffles our product development team had the grueling task of taste testing many different types of chocolate. We found that a dark chocolate by Guittard paired harmoniously with our Tuscan style extra virgin olive oil, bringing forth notes of blackberry and currant. We worked diligently to come up with a flavor pairing and texture that would stimulate the most sophisticated palette. The end result is a rich and creamy ganache that is delicately dusted with a bitter sweet cocoa powder. These decadent and delicate morsels are the perfect dessert for a chocolate lover and will be even better paired with a port wine.

This Valentines Day, delight your tasted buds with Frog Hollow Farm’s Dark Chocolate Olive Oil Truffles.  

The holiday season is already upon us. Soon it will be time to gather around the table with family and friends for a special Thanksgiving feast. But for those who are careful about what foods they eat, this is no easy task. Most Thanksgiving dinners are full of saturated fats, prepackaged ingredients, and produce that is far from healthy. Because of this, many health conscious people are starting to make a few changes to their meal preparation habits. And the first one of them is to use only organic ingredients. Organic foods won't make someone sick from all of the chemicals in them. They aren't genetically modified, and they have no added hormones or antibiotics. So all of the dishes that they are used in are healthy and full of flavor. If you are considering an all organic Thanksgiving dinner yourself, here are some great tips to help you get started.

Plan Ahead

Never wait until the day before Thanksgiving to decide what you are going to make. Plan out your menu, and make a list of all of the ingredients that you are going to need. Then, purchase them in advance. Even though organic foods have to be used fairly quickly, most of them will be alright for about three days in the refrigerator. There are many people who wait until the last minute to buy things, so be prepared to make substitutions in case the store is out of something that you need. If you intend to have an organic meal delivery company do the cooking for you, then contact them at least a week in advance to be sure that they can have your meal ready in time.

Cook From Scratch

Most prepackaged foods are full of preservatives, dyes, and artificial flavors. So it is best not to use them at all if possible. This might seem like an increase in the work it takes to prepare the meal, but it won't be if you keep your menu simple. You don't have to have quite so many dishes to make everyone happy. Just choose a main dish, some type of starch, a vegetable or salad, and a dessert.

Choose Fresh Ingredients

Organic foods don't last as long as those that have preservatives in them. And there are not many options available as far as canned or frozen organic items, but don't let this stop you from getting the items that you want. Many supermarkets sell fresh organic turkeys and fruits and vegetables. If you are lucky enough to have your own herb garden, you can just pick some fresh herbs to flavor your dishes with. If you don't have one, then ask around your neighborhood. Many gardeners are more than happy to share a few items with others.

Limit Your Grains

It isn't easy to make organic stuffing with organic breadcrumbs and have organic dinner rolls and an organic pie crust because many people have an intolerance to wheat and gluten. There are creative dishes that have similar textures though. For instance, instead of standard breadcrumb dressing, make one up with apples, raisins, carrots, onions, and celery. Saute them all in a skillet with olive oil for a much healthier version that won't upset someone's delicate digestive system. Pumpkin mousse can replace a pumpkin pie. And you might want to just skip having rolls completely.

Leave Out the Sugar

Organic fruits have a natural sweetness to them that doesn't have to be covered up with a heavy dose of white sugar. If you must add something extra to your fruit-based dessert, opt for organic clover honey or agave nectar. Organic maple syrup is also a nice addition, and it adds a touch of fall flavor that everyone will love.

Pomegranates!

Who doesn’t love them? But what a pain, right?!? Not so fast. Removing the edible arils from the pomegranate is easy when you know how to do it. The easiest way is to cut around the diameter of the pomegranate, split it into two, and then pound the back of each half with the back of a large serving spoon.

[Read: How do you know when a pomegranate is ripe?]

The flavor and health benefits of pomegranates make the effort well worth it. Did you know they are one of the best fruits you can eat for your body? The pomegranate is native to Iran and the Himalayas in northern India and has been cultivated and naturalized over the whole Mediterranean region since ancient times. It is widely cultivated throughout India and the drier parts of southeast Asia, Malaya, the East Indies and tropical Africa. The tree was introduced into California by Spanish settlers in 1769.

According to an article published online on New York Times best-selling author Dr. Fuhrman's website, pomegranates have anti-cancer properties; the protect against heart diseases and guard memory and brain function. Read all 9  benefits at: https://www.drfuhrman.com/learn/library/articles/23/9-pomegranate-health-benefits-that-offer-powerful-disease-protection.

Frog Hollow Farms' Rebecca Courchesne (Chef Becky!), co-author of CookingLight Magazine's "The Art of Preserving," shares her experience with the Warren pears and describes how she fell in love with them. Are you wondering how to cook Warren pears? Learn from the expert herself…

How Chef Becky fell in love with Warren pears…
If you are anything like me you grew up eating pears that were firm, gritty and tasteless or, canned pears that were sickeningly sweet. I never liked pears because I never had a good one. It wasn’t until I was in my 20’s and began cooking professionally and shopping at Monterey Market under the tutelage of Bill Fujimoto and inspiration from Lindsey Shere founding pastry chef of Chez Panisse, that I began to appreciate pears. But it was not until I had a Warren that I began to love them.

How are pears different from stone fruit? How to ripen pears after picking?
At Frog Hollow, the stone fruit season went by in a flash this year. For so many years we only had stone fruit and so by September, we were “done.” Now, our season goes on into winter with pears, apples, olives and citrus. Even though our picking season is longer, once the Warren pears are picked and tucked away to transform from starch to pure sweetness and the last peach has been picked, things slow down considerably. We have all winter to sell our pears as they will remain in cold storage through the fall and early winter. Nothing is as intense, hectic or as consuming as the stone fruit season; stone fruit is fleeting and tempestuous and has to be picked and eaten right away and cannot linger like the steady, patient pear.

Which are the different types of European pears grown at Frog Hollow Farm in Brentwood, California?
As many of you know, we have 4 types of pears here at Frog Hollow. Mostly pears are picked in late August, although this year everything was early. The Warrens were picked first, then the Taylor’s Gold and lastly the Bosc (I am referring to the European pears, not the Asian Pears here, those we’ll talk about later). As with the stone fruit, the pears were picked early and backed up on each other in ripening. Usually we would be beginning to pick Bosc right now but here we are, early September and all our pears are picked.

Can you cook with Warren pears? Recipe ideas, please…
The Warrens are named after a gentleman named T.O. Warren who discovered the pear in his neighbors’ yard near his home in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. They are by far my favorite pear for eating fresh. Nothing beats cutting into a ripe warren pear, unveiling the smooth, cream colored flesh that drips its sweet juice before the knife finishes making its cut. It has a distinct sweet, buttery flavor. September through January we eat sliced Warren Pears on sour dough toast with blue castello cheese. (see recipe). This also makes an easy and impressive appetizer served with arugula tossed in shallot/champagne vinaigrette. They are also great for baking and poaching although they are softer than and not as hardy for poaching as the Bosc.

How Chef Becky fell in love with Warren pears…

If you are anything like me you grew up eating pears that were firm, gritty and tasteless or, canned pears that were sickeningly sweet. I never liked pears because I never had a good one. It wasn’t until I was in my 20’s and began cooking professionally  and shopping at Monterey Market under the tutelage of Bill Fujimoto and inspiration from Lindsey Shere founding pastry chef of Chez Panisse, that I began to appreciate pears. But it was not until I had a Warren that I began to love them.

How are pears different from stone fruit? How to ripen pears after picking?

At Frog Hollow, the stone fruit season went by in a flash this year. For so many years we only had stone fruit and so by September, we were “done.”  Now, our season goes on into winter with pears, apples, olives and citrus. Even though our picking season is longer, once the Warren pears are picked and tucked away to transform from starch to pure sweetness and the last peach has been picked, things slow down considerably. We have all winter to sell our pears as they will remain in cold storage through the fall and early winter. Nothing is as intense, hectic or as consuming as the stone fruit season; stone fruit is fleeting and tempestuous and has to be picked and eaten right away and cannot linger like the steady, patient pear. 

Which are the different types of European pears grown at Frog Hollow Farm in Brentwood, California?

As many of you know, we have 4 types of pears here at Frog Hollow. Mostly pears are picked in late August, although this year everything was early. The Warrens were picked first, then the Taylor’s Gold and lastly the Bosc (I am referring to the European pears, not the Asian Pears here, those we’ll talk about later). As with the stone fruit, the pears were picked early and backed up on each other in ripening. Usually we would be beginning to pick Bosc right now but here we are, early September and all our pears are picked.

Can you cook with Warren pears? Recipe ideas, please…

The Warrens are named after a gentleman named T.O. Warren who discovered the pear in his neighbors’ yard near his home in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.  They are by far my favorite pear for eating fresh. Nothing beats cutting into a ripe warren pear, unveiling the smooth, cream colored flesh that drips its sweet juice before the knife finishes making its cut. It has a distinct sweet, buttery flavor. September through January we eat sliced Warren Pears on sour dough toast with blue castello cheese. (see recipe). This also makes an easy and impressive appetizer served with arugula tossed in shallot/champagne vinaigrette. They are also great for baking and poaching although they are softer than and not as hardy for poaching as the Bosc.

We have started picking some of our organic heirloom tomatoes already; yes, and it's only the beginning of August. We have been growing heirloom tomatoes for over three years at Frog Hollow Farm. And just like our fruit, we like our tomatoes vine-ripened; picked and packed the day of shipping; and delivered vine to table in 48 hours

Over time, we have identified the most delicious varieties and narrowed down our favorites. But what makes our heirloom tomatoes so tasty? Here are 5 fun facts about them: 

Fact 1: We plant marigolds and alyssum around our rows of tomatoes toencourage pollination.

Fact 2: We grow all of our tomatoes from seed, in our own greenhouse. They are then transplanted by hand into the field.

Fact 3: Our tomatoes are planted in compost that we produce on-site at Frog Hollow Farm; watered with drip irrigation; and fertilized with oyster shell flour from a local company in Petaluma, CA.

Fact 4: Our heirloom varieties can reach 13° brix**—that means more thantwice as much sweet tomato flavor as most commercially grown tomatoes.

Fact 5: We hand-prune and handpick our tomatoes to encourage high quality fruiting.

So what does Brix measurement tell us?
According to Jon Rowley, an acclaimed food connoisseur and the marketing genius behind Seattle-based Metropolitan Market's Peach-O-Rama, "A high brix reading (each fruit and vegetable has a different Brix range) indicates the fruit came from a successful plant and that the farmer has soil, watering, air and sun working together optimally." He explains, "If a plant has high brix it has more of everything, especially taste."

Have you ever indulged in our succulent, organic fruit and found yourself craving… cheese? Frog Hollow Farm is delighted to announce that you can now find our legendary fruit and the smooth, distinct flavors of Petaluma’s Cowgirl Creamery and other Northern California artisan cheesemakers, all in one place, with one click.

Year-round (and endless) pairing ideas

Some of Northern California’s most iconic cheeses—Mt. Tam, Estero Gold Reserve and Seascape—are here and we’re dreaming up ways to pair them with our fresh fruits, dried fruits, conserves and baked goods.

Cowgirl Creamery co-founder Sue Connelly has a few ideas: In spring and summer, try serving sweet, juicy apricots, halved and pitted, with a wedge of Cowgirl Creamery’s elegant Mt. Tam. Or pair the natural tartness of a nectarine with tangy Estero Gold Reserve from Valley Ford, CA. Frog Hollow Farm’s stone fruit conserves, garnished with dried pears, pay a sweet complement to the semi-firm, smooth texture of Seascape—a Paso Robles favorite.

Still hungry? In fall, Seascape’s cheddar-like flavors pair beautifully with our Fuji apples. (Did someone say grilled cheese?) And our Olive Oil Rosemary crackers add a savory crunch to your holiday fruit and cheese platters.

Customers benefit from our longtime friendship

Farmer Al and Cowgirl Creamery co-founder Peggy Smith met years ago when Smith was cooking at Chez Panisse. Frog Hollow Farm was among the certified organic farmers Smith sought for dependably delicious fruit. Years later, Frog Hollow Farm and Cowgirl Creamery became shop neighbors at San Francisco’s Ferry Building and at local farmer’s markets across the Bay Area. Both companies share a commitment to the principles of organic agriculture and to producing the best tasting food available anywhere.

Now you can reap the benefits of this years-long friendship! Cheers!

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